Wednesday, April 11, 2018

The Fiber35 Diet

The Fiber35 Diet
Authors Brenda Watson and Leonard Smith have gotten together to present the book The Fiber35 Diet: Nature’s Weight Loss Secret. The Fiber35 Diet is a New York Times Bestselling diet guide that can help you lose weight. Brenda Watson is a certified nutritionist while Leonard Smith is a medical doctor specializing in gastrointestinal surgery.
The basic premise of the Fiber35 Diet is that eating a diet high in fiber can give you the maximum benefit of health. It is recommended that each individual have 35 grams of fiber per day. (Most Americans get far less than 35 grams.) The Fiber35 Diet shows how you can easily incorporate more fiber in to your diet so that you feel full longer, increase your metabolism and lose weight.
The Fiber35 Diet goes into great detail about the benefits of fiber and how you can not only lose weight, but help prevent diseases and keep the weight off. The book encourages exercise as part of the Fiber35 Diet as well as includes several recipes to help you add more fiber to your daily meals.
There is also a detoxification process that you go through with this program to jump start your weight loss. The book addresses several things that may be causing your weight gain, but in the end, you are given the solution for combatting those to start losing weight.
You can expect to lose up to eight pounds during the first month on The Fiber35 Diet.
PRO
Program uses fiber to aid in weight loss
Recipe ideas included
Exercise is a key component in the program
Benefits of fiber include disease prevention and feeling full longer
Program written by a medical doctor and licensed nutritionist
Also features a website and a line of Fiber35 products
image: https://www.dietsinreview.com/images/icons/link.png
CON
Many of the recipes offered are low in fiber
Not as highly reviewed as some other diet plan books
May cause tummy troubles upon starting the program
image: https://www.dietsinreview.com/images/icons/link.png
DIET and NUTRITION
Fiber35 shows you to consume an ideal ratio of about 65% insoluble fiber to 35% soluble fiber every day. Incorporating more fiber helps meet your nutritional as well as dietary needs and can help you lose weight. Fiber adds bulk and provides a feeling of fullness while also promoting a healthy digestive system.
You are encouraged to start the program slowly by simply switching refined and white grains to whole and unprocessed grains like whole-wheat pasta, brown rice and whole-grain bread, in addition to adding a handful of raspberries or blueberries to your morning cereal and topping your afternoon yogurt with crushed flax seeds.
Most foods that are high in fiber are also low on the glycemic index and low in calories. The Fiber35 diet is largely comprised of whole and natural foods like vegetables, fruits, whole-grains, beans and legumes. It is also important to increase your intake of water or other non-caloric fluids as you start The Fiber35 Diet in order to avoid gas, cramping and constipation.
In addition to the book, there is also a line of accompanying Fiber35 products like bars, shakes and supplements.
EXERCISE
There is a focus on exercise to be used along with The Fiber35 Diet, as exercise is not only believed to assist in weight loss but also to aid in moving food through the body.
Cardiovascular and strength-training exercises are encouraged. The Fiber35 Diet website includes sample exercises for you to perform that focus on upper and lower body strength.
CONCLUSION
The Fiber35 Diet takes the time to explain the many benefits of fiber, as well as break down what exactly fiber is. Using this program, you can lose weight, keep it off and truly get healthy. With this program you receive recipe suggestions, information on exercising and so much more. If you are looking for a diet that will do more than just help you lose weight, The Fiber35 Diet might be the program you need.
The Fiber35 Diet also has an accompanying website and a line of Fiber35 products that make getting in enough daily fiber convenient and easy for busy schedules.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Top 10 Superfoods for Spring

Top 10 Superfoods for Spring
Power up your diet
There's a food movement afoot: Eating well to look, feel, and perform our very best is hot. And as Jamie Oliver and Michelle Obama alike are showing us, this isn't a matter of choking down foods because they're good for you. It's about filling your plate with delicious fare.
"Food, if it's chosen well, can reshape our medical destinies for the better," says David Katz, MD, director of the Yale Prevention Research Center. It can also improve our mood, focus, energy, skin, and metabolism. Here's how to graze your way to a supercharged you.
Walnuts
Good for: Mood
Walnuts are packed with tryptophan, an amino acid your body needs to create the feel-great chemical serotonin. (In fact, Spanish researchers found that walnut eaters have higher levels of this natural mood-regulator.) Another perk: They're digested slowly which contributes to mood stability and can help you tolerate stress.
Asparagus
Good for: Mood
These spears are one of the best veggie sources of folate, a B vitamin that could help keep you out of a slump. "Folate is important for the synthesis of the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine," says David Mischoulon, MD, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School. All of these are crucial for mood.
Spring garlic
Good for: Weight Loss
The slim-you benefit of this seasonal treat lies in a compound called allicin, which gives garlic its pungent smell. Allicin may keep you from overeating by stimulating satiety in the brain.
Spring garlic has a milder, sweeter taste than the dried white bulbs you buy later in the season. Enjoy it diced on salad for a fat-fighting side or lunch.
Legumes
Good for: Weight Loss
Beans are one of your best bets if you're trying to drop pounds, Your body has to work to break down the bean to get through the fiber, so you're actually expending energy to digest it.
The protein in legumes activates an "I'm satisfied" message in the hunger center of your brain.
Spinach
Good for: Energy
These tasty leaves are a great source of iron (especially if you don't eat meat), which is a key component in red blood cells that fuel our muscles with oxygen for energy.
Researchers in Sweden recently identified another way in which these greens might keep you charged: Compounds found in spinach actually increase the efficiency of our mitochondria, the energy-producing factories inside our cells. That means eating a cup of cooked spinach a day may give you more lasting power on the elliptical machine or other aerobic activities.
Artichokes
Good for: Energy
If you've been huffing and puffing up the stairs, try these spiky-leafed vegetables. They're loaded with magnesium, a mineral vital for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body—including generating energy, says Forrest Nielsen, PhD, a U.S. Department of Agriculture research nutritionist. "If you're not getting enough magnesium, your muscles have to work harder to react and you tire more quickly."
About 68% of us aren't getting enough of this mineral. For women, the goal is 320 milligrams (mg) per day. One medium artichoke provides 77 mg of magnesium (and just 60 calories!). Other top sources include nuts, legumes, and whole grains.
Salmon
Good for: Skin
There's wrinkle prevention on your plate: "Salmon is rich in a fatty acid called eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a type of omega-3 that naturally helps block the release of UV-induced enzymes that diminish collagen, causing lines and sagging skin," says Ariel Ostad, MD, a dermatologist in New York City.
Bonus: Omega-3s also regulate oil production in the skin and boost hydration, which helps keep your complexion dewy and acne-free.
Strawberries
Good for: Skin
They are loaded with antioxidants that help your skin repair damage caused by environmental factors like pollution and UV rays. Plus, they're packed with vitamin C (less than a cup gets you your entire 75 mg RDA)—the vitamin associated with fewer wrinkles and less dryness, per research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Eggs
Good for: Memory
Have your over-easies before you hit the Easter egg hunt. The yolks are chock-full of choline, a key nutrient for recall. "Your body needs choline to make a brain chemical called acetylcholine, crucial for storing memories," says Steven Zeisel, MD, director of the Nutrition Research Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for choline is 425 mg. There are 147 mg in a large egg; other good options are nuts and red meat.
Blueberries
Good for: Memory
Eat them regularly and you may reap big brain benefits. In a recent study, people with age-related memory decline who drank roughly two and a half cups of blueberry juice per day for 12 weeks (the equivalent of eating a cup of blueberries) made significant improvements on memory and learning tests compared with those who drank a placebo juice.
The secret component? A type of antioxidant called anthocyanins, says study co-author Robert Krikorian, PhD, a psychologist at the University of Cincinnati: "Anthocyanins have been shown in animal studies to increase signals among brain cells and improve their resilience, enhancing learning 

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Gluten-Free Diet

Gluten-Free Diet

Definition
A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes the protein gluten. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye, and a cross between wheat and rye called triticale.

A gluten-free diet is essential for managing signs and symptoms of celiac disease and other medical conditions associated with gluten. A gluten-free diet is, however, popular among people without gluten-related medical conditions. The claimed benefits of the diet are improved health, weight loss and increased energy.

Most clinical studies regarding gluten-free diets have been conducted with people who have celiac disease. Therefore, there is little clinical evidence about the health benefits of a gluten-free diet in the general population.

Removing gluten from your diet likely changes your overall intake of fiber, vitamins and other nutrients. Therefore, regardless of your reasons for following a gluten-free diet, it's important to know how it can affect your overall nutritional needs.

Your doctor or a dietitian can help you make appropriate dietary choices to maintain a well-balanced diet.

Celiac disease - is a condition in which gluten triggers immune system activity that damages the lining of the small intestine. Over time this damage prevents the absorption of nutrients from food. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder.

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity - causes some signs and symptoms associated with celiac disease — including abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, "foggy brain," rash or headache — even though there is no damage to the tissues of the small intestine. Studies show that the immune system plays a role, but the process isn't well-understood.

Gluten ataxia - an autoimmune disorder, affects certain nerve tissues and causes problems with muscle control and voluntary muscle movement.

Wheat allergy- like other food allergies, is the result of the immune system mistaking gluten or some other protein found in wheat as a disease-causing agent, such as a virus or bacteria. The immune system creates an antibody to the protein, prompting an immune system response that may result in congestion, breathing difficulties and other symptoms.

Claims about the general health benefits of a gluten-free diet are the motivation for other people to avoid wheat and other grains with gluten. Very little clinical research has been conducted, however, about the benefits of the diet for people who do not have a gluten-related medical condition.

Diet details
Following a gluten-free diet requires paying careful attention to both the ingredients of foods and their nutritional content.

Many naturally gluten-free foods can be a part of a healthy diet:

Fruits and vegetables
Beans, seeds and nuts in their natural, unprocessed forms
Eggs
Lean, nonprocessed meats, fish and poultry
Most low-fat dairy products
Grains, starches or flours that you can include in a gluten-free diet include:
Amaranth
Arrowroot
Buckwheat
Corn and cornmeal
Flax
Gluten-free flours (rice, soy, corn, potato, bean)
Hominy (corn)
Millet
Quinoa
RiceSorghum
Soy
Tapioca (cassava root)
Teff
Grains not allowed

Avoid all foods and drinks containing the following:

Wheat
Barley
Rye
Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)
Oats (in some cases)
While oats are naturally gluten-free, they may be contaminated during production with wheat, barley or rye. Oats and oat products labeled gluten-free have not been cross-contaminated. Some people with celiac disease, however, cannot tolerate the gluten-free labeled oats.

Wheat terms to know

There are different varieties of wheat, all of which contain wheat gluten:

Durum
Einkorn
Emmer
Kamut
Spelt
Wheat flours have different names based on how the wheat is milled or the flour is processed. All of the following flours have gluten:

Enriched flour with added vitamins and minerals
Farina, milled wheat usually used in hot cereals
Graham flour, a course whole-wheat flour
Self-rising flour, also called phosphate flour
Semolina, the part of milled wheat used in pasta and couscous
Gluten-free food labels

When you are buying processed foods, you need to read labels to determine if they contain gluten. Foods that contain wheat, barley, rye or triticale — or an ingredient derived from them — must be labeled with the name of the grain in the label's content list.

Foods that are labeled gluten-free, according to the Food and Drug Administration rules, must have fewer than 20 parts per million of gluten. Foods with these labels may include:

In general, avoid the following foods unless they're labeled as gluten-free or made with corn, rice, soy or other gluten-free grain:

Beer, ale, porter, stout (usually barley)
Breads
Bulgur
Cakes and pies
Candies
Cereals
Communion wafers
Cookies and crackers
Croutons
French fries
Gravies
Imitation meat or seafood
Malt, malt flavoring and other malt products (barley)
Matzo
Pastas
Hot dogs and processed luncheon meats
Salad dressings
Sauces, including soy sauce
Seasoned rice mixes
Seasoned snack foods, such as potato and tortilla chips
Self-basting poultry
Soups, bouillon or soup mixes
Vegetables in sauce
Medications and supplements

Prescription and over-the-counter medications may use wheat gluten as a binding agent. Talk to your doctor or pharmacists about the drugs you're taking. Dietary supplements that contain wheat gluten must have "wheat" stated on the label.

Results
Keeping a strict gluten-free diet is a lifelong necessity for people with celiac disease. Following the diet and avoiding cross-contamination results in fewer symptoms and complications of the disease.

For some people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity, the condition may not be lifelong. Some research suggests that you may follow the diet for a certain period, such as one or two years and then retest your sensitivity to gluten. For other people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity, the diet may be a lifelong treatment.

Few clinical studies have looked at the benefits of the diet among the general population — people without celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. There is not enough clinical evidence to determine the accuracy of the following claims about the diet's results:

Weight loss
Overall improved health
Improved gastrointestinal health
Improved athletic performance

Risks
The foods not included in a gluten-free diet provide important vitamins and other nutrients. For example, whole-grain breads and other products are natural or enriched sources of the following:

Iron
Calcium
Fiber
Thiamin
Riboflavin
Niacin
Folate

Therefore, following a gluten-free diet will likely change your nutrient intake. Some gluten-free breads and cereals have significantly varied nutrient levels than the products they are replacing. Some gluten-free foods also have higher fat and sugar contents than the gluten-containing food being replaced. It's important to read labels, not only for gluten content but also for overall nutrient levels, salt, calories from fats and calories from sugars.

You can talk to your doctor or dietitian about foods that would provide healthy, nutrient-rich alternatives.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Keto-Diet is the New Word, But is it for You?

Keto-diet is the new buzz word, but is it for you?

Ketogenic or Keto- diet is the new buzz, everyone is talking about it. Clients and friends are starting to ask me about “going keto,” because they’ve heard it will help them lose weight, improve athletic ability and even boost brain power.

Though not new, it has become more and more popular in recent times. There are many claims that keto-diet not only helps with weight loss but aids in many health conditions. So, let find out if ketogenic diet is right for you, or is it just another fad?

What is ketogenic diet?
A ketogenic diet is basically high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carb diet. It mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis. The purpose of the ketogenic diet is to switch our bodies from using carbohydrates for fuel to burning ketones instead. When the body is starved of carbohydrates, fat is broken down and ketones are formed by the liver and then burned for energy instead of glucose there by entering into “nutritional ketosis”

One extremely popular version of a keto diet is the Atkins diet.

Mounting research suggests nutritional ketosis is the answer to a long list of health problems, starting with obesity but before we go all crazy and think of this diet as the “universal remedy” let’s look at some pros and cons and decided if keto lifestyle is right for you.

What consist of a keto diet?
Ketogenic diet consists of limiting carbohydrate intake anywhere between 20–50 grams per day. “The exact ratio of recommended macronutrients or “macros”( carbohydrate, protein and fat are called macronutrients) in your diet may vary depending on your specific goals and current state of health, age, gender and level of activity.

What is included in the diet?
Meats- chicken, beef, lamb, fish, pork, shellfish
Whole eggs
Full fat cheese, cream, real butter, full fat yogurt, sour cream
Above ground vegetables- broccoli, kale, mushrooms,spinach, brussell sprouts, eggplant,olives, avocado, asparagus ect..
Nuts- macadamia nuts, walnuts, almonds, sunflower seeds, hazel nuts, ect..
What you cannot eat?
Any added sugar to products- candy, cake, juice, chocolate, soft drinks, sports drinks, donuts, pastries, ice cream
grains and starches- potatoes, pasta, bread, rice, cereal, french fries, potato chips ect..
Processed oils - margarine, cooking oils
beer
On occassion you can have hard liquor, vodka, whisky ect.. with no mixers and dark chocolate 70% cocoa

How to enter into KETOSIS?
You’ll need to cut down to 50 grams or less of carbs per day, or about 5 percent of your total calories. Just as a reference point, the average carb intake is around 250-300 grams per day, give or take. 1 cup cooked rice is 30 gms, 1 slice of bread is 12 gms, 1 medium banana is 20 gms, 1 medium potato is 20 gms.
Next comes proteins, 35 percent of your calories should come from protein. This is about 50-100 grams roughly. And the major chunk comes from consumption of good fat, 65 percent (or even more) of your calories. That’s roughly 5 avocados or about 11 tablespoons of coconut oil.

How does one stay in ketosis?
There are several tips for getting into and staying in ketosis, but you basically have to follow the very low carb, moderate protein and higher fat plan for at least 7 days, give or take, to even get there. You can get into ketosis quickly by fasting and burning up all your carbs. Some people combine “intermittent fasting” with ketogenic diets for this reason. It can take up to 2 weeks to get into ketosis, and during this time you can feel super crappy (called the “KETO- flu”) as your body is making the switch from glucose to fat. Symptoms include headache, fatigue, constipation, brain fog, dizziness, muscle cramps.

BENEFITS OF A KETOGENIC DIET
The ketogenic diet has been used for many years, mostly in clinical settings like hospitals, as part of the treatment protocol for children and adults. Some of the claimed benefits include:
Fast weight loss and improvement in cholesterol, lipids, and glucose levels
Blood sugar balance and enhanced insulin sensitivity
Increased satiety, decreased food cravings (not having to eat every few hours)
Improved energy levels
Mood stabilization
Metabolic syndrome management, improved cholesterol levels
Inflammation management
Endurance enhancement

CONCERNS WITH A KETOGENIC DIET
***Sounds promising isn’t it? Not so fast.
Caution should be made in recommending keto diets to women because they can damage a woman’s metabolism.
Low carb diets like a keto diet can affect thyroid function. If you have any thyroid concerns than this diet is not for you.
Folks prone to stress this diet is not for you.
Folks with weak digestion may not be able to digest such large amount of fat.
Risk that many may end up eating fats that aren’t so healthy and messing with their lipid profile is high. (one must monitor their blood report on regular basis, if following keto diet)
You won’t be eating as much heart healthy and gut satiating fiber.
Since you restrict on delicious food like-fruits veggies and legume,s you are depriving your body of some essential nutrients, disease fighting antioxidants, phytonutrients and fiber.
Some studies associated with risk of hormonal imbalance, menstrual irregularities, constipation (due to lack of fiber) and nutrient deficiencies.
It needs lot of discipline and dedication to may sure you plan and prep for your meals.
Sustainability of this eating approach is highly questionable.
Bottom Line: there’s no one right diet for everyone, and the keto diet is no exception.
Obese women who are over 30-40 pound to lose and who do NOT have thyroid or endocrine imbalance may also benefit from a keto diet for weight loss, but with caution.
There is nothing, nothing at all that comes close to eating a simple wholesome meal. If you do consider to try out the ketogenic diet, consult with your health care provider or Nutritionist.

***Over the years I have observed people on a ketogenic diet, it is very hard to maintain. Many of these people after losing the weight, end up going back to the way they were eating and gain all the weight back they have lost and more. Remember if you do try the keto diet, you have to follow it strictly and not do a modified version to stay in ketosis.Ket

Friday, November 17, 2017

***8 Healthy Holiday-Eating Strategies ***

***8 Healthy Holiday-Eating Strategies ***
**The Strategy: Bring Your Own Food
Contribute a healthy dish to a gathering to ensure there’s something you can indulge in.
Tricks to Try
Eat the best-for-you offerings first. For example, hot soup as a first course―especially when it's broth-based, not cream-based―can help you avoid eating too much during the main course.
Stand more than an arm's length away from munchies, like a bowl of nuts or chips, while you chat so you're not tempted to raise your hand to your mouth every few seconds.
Concentrate on your meal while you're eating it. Focus on chewing your food well and enjoying the smell, taste, and texture of each item. Research shows that mealtime multitasking (whether at home or at a party) can make you pop mindless calories into your mouth. Of course, dinner-party conversation is only natural, but try to set your food down until you're finished chatting so you are more aware of what you're taking in.
**The Strategy: Don’t Go Hungry to the Mall
To cut down on the lure of the food court, never go to the mall on an empty stomach.
Tricks to Try
Plan your shopping route so you don’t pass the Cinnabon stand a dozen times. The obvious reason? Both sights and smells can coax you to eat, and with some vendors purposefully wafting their aromas your way, saying no can feel impossible.
Choose a proper restaurant over the grab-and-go food court whenever you can. And request a table away from loud sounds and distractions, which can cause you to eat more. The bright lights and noisy hard surfaces can speed up the rate at which you eat and lead to overeating.
**The Strategy: Keep Track of What You Eat
Maintain a food diary to help you stay committed to your goals during this risky eating period.
Tricks to Try
Weigh yourself daily and use that number to guide your actions. (Food diaries are helpful, but only if you’re totally honest and diligent about recording every morsel you eat.) Research has shown that women who step on the scale every day and then act accordingly, either increasing their exercise or being stricter about their eating, are 82 percent less likely to regain lost weight than those who don’t weigh in as often.
Zip yourself into your favorite pair of slim-fitting pants once a week and note how they fit. Too tight? Adjust your eating and exercise habits. Just right? Keep up the good work.
**The Strategy: Eat Before Going to a Party
Before going out, have a healthy snack to curb your appetite.
Tricks to Try
Eat breakfast. This has been shown to prevent overeating later in the day.
Limit the number of high-calorie foods on your party plate. Research has shown that when faced with a variety of foods with different tastes, textures, smells, shapes, and colors, people eat more―regardless of their true hunger level. Cutting down on your personal smorgasbord can decrease what you end up eating by 20 to 40 percent.
Choose foods wisely, filling your plate with low-calorie items, such as leafy green salads, vegetable dishes, and lean proteins, and taking smaller portions of the richer ones. That way, you can eat a larger amount of food for fewer calories and not feel deprived.
**The Strategy: Keep Healthy Snacks at the Office
Stash healthy foods in your desk at work so you’re not as tempted by the treats piling up at the office.
Tricks to Try
Try to keep communal office goodies out of view, either in an area that isn’t as highly trafficked as the kitchen or the break room, or in dark containers or covered dishes. In one study, people ate 26 percent more Hershey’s Kisses when the candies were in clear dishes versus white ones. And when the chocolates were placed six feet away, the average person ate only four a day, as opposed to nine a day when they were within arm’s reach.
Before you allow yourself a splurge, do something healthy, like eating a piece of fruit, walking around the office for five minutes, or climbing a few flights of stairs.
Plan on taking whatever tempts you home, and delay the daily indulgence until just before bedtime. At that point, you’re less likely to crave another treat immediately than you would during your afternoon coffee break, especially if the whole box is no longer around.
**The Strategy: Manage Portion Size
Take sensible portions so you don’t end up eating too much.
Tricks to Try
Use smaller plates and serving utensils. Try a salad or dessert plate for the main course and a teaspoon to serve yourself. What looks like a normal portion on a 12-inch plate or a troughlike bowl can, in fact, be sinfully huge. In one study conducted at the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University, even nutrition experts served themselves 31 percent more ice cream when using oversize bowls compared with smaller bowls. The size of the serving utensil mattered, too: Subjects served themselves 57 percent more when they used a three-ounce scoop versus a smaller scoop. Pour drinks into tall, skinny glasses, not the fat, wide kind.
**The Strategy: Keep Up the Exercise
You’re determined to squeeze in at least one or two workouts a week, no matter how busy you get.
Tricks to Try
Break it up. If you don’t have time for your daily four-mile walk, do a few 10- or 15-minute spurts of exercise throughout the day (to accumulate the surgeon general’s recommendation of 30 minutes a day). They can be just as effective at maintaining overall fitness as one continuous workout.
Tell yourself that all the running around you’re doing (cleaning for houseguests, dashing through a million stores to find the perfect presents) can help keep your weight in check. In one Harvard study, people who were simply told that they did enough in their daily lives to meet the surgeon general’s recommendations lost weight and body fat without consciously changing a thing. A possible reason? Believing that what they were doing was having a positive effect may have led to subtle changes in their overall health behaviors.
**The Strategy: Choose Your Indulgences
You intend to stave off feelings of deprivation by allowing yourself a “cheat” day a week.
Tricks to Try
Plan in advance to eat a little more and be a little more flexible at this time of year, when you face daily temptations. That way, you can savor the culinary joys of the holidays a little more often and you'll be less likely to binge. For instance, rather than inhaling four sugar cookies on your cheat day, allow yourself one as a dessert when the mood strikes. Then make one little switch during the day to account for those calories―maybe skipping that morning latte or cutting out an afternoon snack.
Choose your indulgences wisely. Instead of wasting calories on foods that you can have at any time of the year, pick items that are truly special and unique to the season, like your grandmother's candied yams or your daughter's first batch of Christmas cookies.